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0.1
 

In January we detected a phishing mailing that was sent on behalf of Apple. The messages contained an offer to purchase a card giving a discount of 150 euros in any European AppStore for only 9 euros. The senders also underlined that only valued customers were eligible to receive the card.

To place an order for the card, Apple fans had to open an attached HTML page and fill in all the fields, such as information about the user’s bank card, including the three-digit security code stated on the reverse of the card.

In exchange, the scammers promised to send a discount card via email within 24 hours. But evidently it was just another scam to trick users. The fraudsters also used the Apple logo and automated subscriptions at the end of the message to confuse victims.

 

The scammers didn’t just target logins and passwords for personal accounts but also users’ banking information, and in order to achieve their goal they are willing to promise anything. Inexperienced users may find it difficult to see through the fraud, but requests for confidential bank information or data that gives access to personal accounts are a clear sign of a phishing scam.   

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Software|iOS update available - version 7.0.4 is here

Stefan Tanase
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted November 15, 11:09  GMT
Tags: Apple iPhone, Apple, Vulnerabilities
0.3
 

This week, Apple has released a small but very important update to their popular mobile operating system - iOS 7.0.4. According to the details provided, by Apple, the update comes with several bug fixes and improvements, including a fix for an issue that causes FaceTime calls to fail in some cases.

But the latest iOS update also comes with an important security fix for CVE-2013-5193, a vulnerability allowing App and In-App purchases to be completed with insufficient authorization - meaning that the password prompt presented to a signed in user before making an App purchase could have been bypassed and the transaction completed without providing a password.

Why are updates so important?

This software update for iOS, just like many other software updates for any platform, shows once again the importance of updating. Updates don’t just fix innocent bugs, they don’t just improve the user’s experience. They do that, yes, but most of the times updates also fix security vulnerabilities which can be exploited in-the-wild.

How to update your iOS device?

The quickest way to update your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch is to do it directly from the device. Just make sure you have everything backed up before you proceed, that you are connected to a WiFi network and the device has enough power, then just go to Settings › General › Software Update. If an update is available, tap Download, then Install.

You can also update your device through iTunes, while it’s connected through a cable. For more details and tips, Apple has a complete step-by-step guide available here: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4623

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Incidents|Apple of discord

Nadezhda Demidova
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted June 20, 14:38  GMT
Tags: Social Engineering, Apple, Phishing
0.4
 

As Apple's popularity grows, so does the desire among fraudsters to make money from the people who own the company's devices. The cybercriminals are aiming to steal Apple ID data which provides access to users' personal information stored in iCloud (e.g., photographs, contacts, documents, email, etc.) as well as to the purchases made in the company's iTunes Store. Many malicious users go further and try to the steal bank card details used to pay for those purchases.

The scammers make use of phishing sites that imitate the official apple.com site. Since the beginning of 2012 until the present time this has resulted in a significant increase in the number of web antivirus detections triggered by users of our products attempting to visit such sites. During that period we have seen on average around 200,000 detections per day. By contrast, in 2011 the figure stood at around 1,000 detections per day.


Heuristic analyzer detections from January 2012 to May 2013 (detections per day)

0.2
 

Microsoft releases nine March Security Bulletins. Four of the Bulletins are rated critical, but of the 20 vulnerabilities being patched, 12 are rated critical and enable remote code execution and elevation of privilege. Microsoft software being patched with critical priority include Internet Explorer, Silverlight, Visio Viewer, and SharePoint. So, pretty much everyone running Windows, and lots of Microsoft shops, should be diligently patching systems today.

Pwn2own attracted top offensive security talent to Cansecwest and awarded a half million in prizes for fresh 0day this year, but the event didn't force much Microsoft fix development for this Bulletin release. Adobe, Java, Firefox and Chrome were all hit this year along with two Internet Explorer 10 0day for full compromise on Windows 8 on a Windows Surface Pro tablet.
Instead, MS013-021 is one giant "Internet Explorer Use-After-Free patch", addressing the longest list of IE use-after-free vulnerabilities in a single monthly Bulletin to date. Knowing that only one of these vulnerabilities was disclosed publicly, it almost looks as though they fixed a fuzzer in their own labs or someone stepped up development of their own.

MS013-022 addresses a memory pointer check in Silverlight component HTML rendering - an unusual problem known as "double de-referencing". The interesting thing here is that this client side RCE enables exploitation across not only all of its supported Windows systems, but across Apple's Mac OS X systems. In the light of OS X mass exploitation this past year and the recent slew of OS X-enabled targeted attacks, this patch is important to folks lugging around systems running OS X.

Microsoft recommends that EMET helps mitigate both the Internet Explorer and the Silverlight issues.

On the server side, altogether different from the client side memory corruption issues above, we see a web service vulnerability in Sharepoint, a pretty widely distributed service in organizations. The eye popper here includes an EoP enabled by an XSS flaw that provides remote users with a method to issue Sharepoint commands in the context of an administrative user on the site. These Sharepoint flaws were all privately reported by an outside researcher, but no public disclosure is known. At the same time, a denial of service and buffer overflow issue is being addressed in the Sharepoint code.

MS012-023 addresses vulnerable code in Visio Viewer 2010, but the vulnerable code also is delivered in components within Microsoft Office. The odd thing is that there is no known code path traversal through the vulnerable code within Microsoft Office. And, Microsoft maintains four or five versions of Visio Viewer, a widely used piece of software for organizations to distribute diagrams and charts of all types. However, this vulnerability only affects one version - Microsoft Visio Viewer 2010. Nonetheless, Microsoft is leaning towards addressing any and all security issues (including unknown future issues), and patching the code everywhere it resides including Microsoft Office, whether or not it is traversed at runtime within Office.

Of the lesser rated vulnerabilities, the kernel mode USB descriptor issue seems the most interesting. And yes, the title of this post is out-of proportion and fairly ridiculous. I don't expect another Stuxnet to rise up simply because of this vulnerability. But, in a flashback to Stuxnet exploit vectors, it provides another vector of delivery for arbitrary code to be executed in kernel mode simply by inserting a USB device into a system.
To clarify, the danger here does not lie in the immediate potential for another Stuxnet. The immediate danger lies in the availability of attack surface demonstrated by Stuxnet to enable highly secured, air gapped industrial environments to be infiltrated with Pearl Harbor style surprise and effectiveness.

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News|Spam one step ahead of iPhone 5 release

Maria
Expert
Posted September 12, 09:01  GMT
Tags: Apple iPhone, Apple
0.1
 

Apple fans are eagerly awaiting the arrival of iPhone 5 which is due out today. Each unveiling of an iDevice is accompanied by a global buzz of excitement which usually attracts the attention of spammers: every new iPad or iPhone inevitably becomes the bait in numerous fake lotteries and other fraudulent emails.

However, customers are not only interested in Apple’s devices but also their accessories. This year’s first registered mass mailing dedicated to the new iPhone came from a Chinese company that has decided to fill this niche.

The advertiser, having first apologized for any inconvenience that may be caused by the email, offers users the chance to buy a case for the new iPhone 5 which has not even been officially presented.

Considering the sort of promises that usually appear in spam, one can only wonder why the sender didn’t offer an actual iPhone 5 or, better still, an iPhone 6 (or whatever it’ll be called in 2013? iPhone 5v?).

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Incidents|Find and Call: Leak and Spam

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted July 05, 12:26  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, Google, Google Android, Apple
0.6
 

Yesterday we were contacted by our partner MegaFon, one of the major mobile carriers in Russia. They notified us about a suspicious application, which was found in both the Apple App Store and Google Play. At first glance, this seemed to be an SMS worm spread via sending short messages to all contacts stored in the phone book with the URL to itself.

However, our analysis of the iOS and Android versions of the same application showed that it’s not an SMS worm but a Trojan that uploads a user’s phonebook to remote server. The 'replication' part is done by the server - SMS spam messages with the URL to the application are being sent from the remote server to all the contacts in the user’s address book.

The application is called ‘Find and Call’ and can be found in both the iOS Apple App Store and Android’s Google Play. We’ve already informed both Apple and Google but we haven’t received an answer yet.

Find and Call in the Apple Store

Find and Call in the Google Play

All user comments (both in Apple Store and Google Play) are pretty angry and contain the same complaint that the app sends SMS spam:

Angry Birds comments

Events|New MacOS X backdoor variant used in APT attacks

Costin Raiu
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted June 29, 12:02  GMT
Tags: Apple MacOS, Apple
0.6
 

Two days ago we intercepted a new APT campaign using a new MacOS X backdoor variant targeted at Uyghur activists.


But before we go into details, let’s start with a quiz:

- The Dalai Lama walks into an Apple Store. Why?

Follow me on Twitter A possible answer is, “to buy one of the new MacBook Pro’s with the Retina display!” (speaking of which, I would very much like to buy one of those as well, but it’s kind of difficult to justify the hit to the family budget)

Joke aside, actually Dalai Lama is a well known Mac user. Here’s a photo of him using a Mac during a conf call:


0.7
 

The Fbi's "Operation Ghost Click" announcement in Nov 2011, involving the Rove Digital botnet delayed cleanup efforts that we previously discussed, continues to haunt both the internet networks and the mass media. A Forbes article and a Times article yesterday brought the apparition back to the front, with some claiming that the site offered by the DNSChanger Working Group is a new one, which it is not. The 2011 Operation being described, and the temporarily outsourced DNS server replacements and delayed cleanup, is the same. This phantom is nothing supernatural, so why all the discussion? The federal judge's extension allowing the Fbi to run these replacement DNS servers still cuts off access in early July. When those replacement servers are removed in early July, the infected systems resolving DNS queries at these previously-owned Rove Digital servers will simply not be able to resolve DNS requests. July 9th will arrive soon, and notifications continue to go out related to the hundreds of thousands of systems in the US alone that are still infected.

In the simplest terms, connectivity will not be severed for DNSChanger-infected systems, but internet communications will not function for infected systems that have not been cleaned up. In the US, government agencies, home users, and other organizations still infected with the malware will have systems that effectively can't get online, can't send email, etc. It will look like they are connected to their network, but they just won't communicate with anything.

At the same time, there seems to be issues with some existing identification efforts. Yesterday, I infected a system with DNSChanger and visited dns-ok.us. Results here:

Regarding the dns-ok site visit, my ISP's support team isn't aware of any "DNS redirections" that would cause the test to fail, and I will update this post with any update from our network admin that they are redirecting my system's dns queries. But that piece is highly doubtful. My point here is that infected system owners may be confused by this check. And the ip address was within the Fbi-provided ranges run by Rove Digital - perhaps a reader knows differently?
UPDATE (1:40 p.m. MST) - I received some details from my local ISP network admin. They are not redirecting any related DNS queries. However, one of their large upstream providers is redirecting DNS requests to another DNS server of their own. The other upstream link to the net does not seem to be re-routing DNS requests. So my infected client's traffic must be favoring routes through the larger upstream provider, and poof, the green/clean response banner appears. Any way you look at it, the response from the site can be inconsistent - sometimes red, sometimes green. Unfortunately, this sort of situation is going to confuse cleanup efforts. So, here we are again. To the potentially millions of folks running DNSChanger infected systems and are listening to the cacophony of incident responder consultants tossing out cheap cynicism that "AV is dead!", go ahead and download an "AV product" to scan your system. Of course, I like recommending our scanners (just visit http://www.kaspersky.com) because I have cleaned up DNSChanger infected systems with it (and the products have fully functional trial periods), along with our TDSSKiller rootkit removal tool to clean up especially complex DNSChanger infections.

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0.3
 

Market share! It’s an easy answer, but not the only one.

In 2011, Apple was estimated to account for over 5% of worldwide desktop/laptop market share. This barrier was a significant one to break - Linux maintains under 2% market share and Google ChromeOS even less. This 15 year peak coincided with the first exploration by the aggressive FakeAv/Rogueware market targeting Apple computers, which we discovered and posted in April 2011 and later in May 2011, which no longer seem to be such an odd coincidence. Also, the delay in Apple malware until now most likely was not because Apple exploits were unavailable, or because the Mac OS X system is especially hardened. The 2007 "Month of Apple Bugs" demonstrated that the Mac OS X and supporting code is full of exploitable flaws. Safari, Quicktime, and other software on Apple devices is regularly exploited during pwnage contests, but widespread cybercrime attention hadn’t caught on until this past year.

At this point, we still don't know who is behind Flashfake, so we don’t know for sure that they were the same Mac OS X FakeAv/Rogueware group. Speculating that eastern euro-cybercrime is behind the botnet would be a pretty confident way to go right now. There are known groups from the region that have succeeded at wringing ad revenues from traffic hijacking. We don't believe that other sensitive data has been targeted. And the exploit distribution URLs that we are aware of have only targeted mac users. These factors limit the operational and technical needs of a financially motivated cybercrime gang.

In a sense, it would appear that their activity was somewhat similar to the Koobface or Tdss gangs. They haven't commited large unique financial crimes to attract the attention of law enforcement, and their malware contains hooks and other code to perform more sophisticated banking crime than search traffic hijacking, but they most likely were looking to make a multitude of small financial gains. On the other hand, thankfully, Apple hasn't given these guys ample notice to make their run. There can be plenty of money in that business - it is estimated that the Koobface guys ran off with millions after Facebook "outted" their operation under investigation. But based on the domain registrations we have examined, the individuals are not quite so public and they are hiding their identities while they hijack search engine traffic. The malware itself injects a number of hooks into running applications, much like the Zeus, SpyEye, and other spyware. If these were used for financial crimes, the group operating this botnet would need to organize money mules and accomplices to launder their stolen money, which would grow the group and attract the attention of other authorities.

On the technology side, Java is a big part of the puzzle. Although the Trojan is called Flashfake because users were being convinced to install the malware as an Adobe Flash update, more recent versions of the malware were being installed via client-side Java exploitation.

Three vulnerabilities were targeted with client-side exploits, none of them were 0day, which seem to have become much more difficult to come by. Besides, this set worked just as well for these operators. It is interesting to note the duration of time from the original Oracle Java security update to the Apple Java security update, and when in that timeframe the release offensive security research publicly appeared. And, when were Metasploit open source exploit modules were released targeting the related Java vulnerabilities? The windows of time may be alarming – these are not 0day exploits, but Apple simply hasn’t released patches, leaving their customers exposed to the equivalent of known 0day exploits.

CVE-2012-0507

2012-02-15 Oracle patches Atomic Reference Array vulnerability

2012-03-10 First Itw exploits targeting the vuln

2012-03-30 Metasploit developers add Java atomicreferencearray exploit module

2012-04-03 Apple patches their code

CVE-2011-3544

2011-05-12 Reported to vendor

2011-11-18 Oracle patched their Java SE

2011-11-30 Metasploit developers add "Rhino exploit" module

2011-11-30 Krebs reports operational Blackhole site with the new Java exploit

2012-3-29 Patched by Apple

CVE-2008-5353

"Deserializing Calendar objects"

2008-08-01 Reported to Sun with first instance of the vulnerability

2008-12-03 Sun patches their code (Sun link down)

2009-05-15 Apple patches MacOSX code

2009-06-16 Metasploit developers add Java deserialization exploit

Also on this list is a lame exploit described as a signed applet social engineering trick.

I'd prefer to call it the "the terribly confused user presented with the Java 'do you want to trust this applet?' dialog and will run anything you present them" gamble. It first became a part of the Metasploit exploit module list on 2010-01-27. Basically, these guys present the user with a file that the user thinks is a JavaUpdate provided by Apple Inc themselves, which they grant trust to perform any action on their machine. The downloader will then communicate with a couple of sites to register and download new Flashfake components. These components in turn, collect the system UUID and timestamp, then auto-generate with a crypto algorithm a set of C2 domains, along with maintaining a list of hard coded domains. A couple of the newer components inject into running processes on the system hooking software functionality and hijacking traffic, much like past TDS malware.

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0.8
 

Late last week, we found evidence of a possible link between a Mac OS X backdoor trojan and an APT attack known as LuckyCat. The IP address of the C&C to which this bot connects (199.192.152.*) was also used in other Windows malware samples during 2011, which made us believe we were looking at the same entity behind these attacks.


Follow me on Twitter For the past two days, we have been monitoring a “fake” infected system - which is a typical procedure we do for APT bots. We were extremely surprised when during the weekend, the APT controllers took over our “goat” infected machine and started exploring it.

On Friday Apri 13, port 80 on the C&C server located at rt*****.onedumb.com and hosted on a VPS in Fremont, U.S. was closed. Saturday, the port was opened and bot started communicating with the C&C server. For the entire day, the traffic was just basic handshakes and exchanges, nothing more.

On the morning of Sunday April 15, the traffic generated by the C&C changed. The attackers took over the connection and started analysing our fake victim machine. They listed the contents of the root and home folders and even stole some of the goat documents we put in there!