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Virus Watch|Carberp-in-the-Mobile

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted December 14, 11:39  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, Internet Banking, Google, ZeuS, Google Android, QR code
0.4
 

We previously wrote several times about Man-in-the-Mobile attacks which aim to steal mTANs sent via SMS. For a long time, only two families of such malware have been known: ZeuS-in-the-Mobile (ZitMo) and SpyEye-in-the-Mobile (SpitMo). ZitMo and SpitMo work together with their Windows ‘brothers’. Actually, without them, they would look like trivial SMS spy Trojans. It is necessary to mention that during the last two years such attacks have been observed only in some European countries like Spain, Italy, Germany, Poland and few others.

But when the mobile version of Carberp Trojan appeared (we detect it as Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Citmo, Carberp-in-the-Mobile) such attacks became real in Russia as well. There is no secret that online banking is becoming more and more popular in Russia; and banks are very active in promoting online banking with various authorization methods.

Carberp for Windows works in a similar way to the ZeuS Trojan. If a user tries to login into his online banking account using a machine infected by Carberp, the malware will modify the transaction so that user credentials are sent to a malicious server rather than a bank server.

In addition to the login and password, cybercriminals still need mTANs in order to confirm any money transfer operation from a stolen account. That is why one of the Carberp modifications (we call it Trojan-Spy.Win32.Carberp.ugu and we've added detection for it on 11th of December) alters the online banking web page on the fly, inviting the user to download and install an application which is allegedly necessary for logging into the system. And the user can get this link via SMS message by entering his phone number or by scanning a QR-code:

According to this screenshot, users of one of the most popular Russian banks, Sberbank, are under attack. ‘Sberbank’ updated its web page on 12th of December with information about the attack. The link in the QR-code led to the fake ‘SberSafe’ application (Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Citmo) which has been in Google Play since 30th of November.

Virus Watch|New ZitMo for Android and Blackberry

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted August 07, 12:54  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, ZeuS, Google Android
0.8
 

Ten months ago we’ve published an article about ZeuS-in-the-Mobile which contains an overview of everything we knew about ZitMo at that moment. The paper finishes with the following prediction: ‘they [attacks involving ZitMo] will become more specifically targeted against a smaller number of victims’. This prediction appears to have been correct. It’s not that often when we hear/find new wave of ZeuS-in-the-Mobile (or SpyEye-in-the-Mobile) attack. So every new piece of information about these types of malware and/or attacks involving them is very important and helps to understand the evolution of one of the most interesting threats in mobile space so far. Just a small reminder: ZeuS-in-the-Mobile is almost 2 years old. And this blog is about new samples (and probably new wave of attack)) of ZitMo for Android and Blackberry.

New samples overview

We’ve got 5 new files of ZitMo: 4 for Blackberry and 1 for Android. As you may know, the Blackberry platform has never been actively targeted by malware. And here we have 4 different samples of ZeuS-in-the-Mobile for Blackberry at once: 3 .cod files and 1 .jar file (with one more .cod inside). Yes, finally we’ve got a ZitMo dropper file for Blackberry.

As for Android, there is only one .apk dropper. But this ZeuS-in-the-Mobile for Android has been modified and now looks like a ‘classic’ ZitMo with same commands and logic.

Countries and C&C numbers

All samples of ZitMo we’ve seen so far target users from various European countries (Spain, Poland, Germany, etc). This case is no exception. Here is a list of countries from which users are threatened by new ZeuS-in-the-Mobile with C&C number from the sample.

Blackberry:

  • Germany +46769436094
  • Spain +46769436073
  • Italy +46769436073
  • Spain +46769436073

Android

  • Germany +46769436094

To summarize, there are 3 countries (Germany, Spain and Italy) and 2 C&C numbers (both are Swedish). We found out that these cell phone numbers belong to Tele2 mobile operator in Sweden.

Virus Watch|Vidro: How deep and mobile is the rabbit hole?

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted August 02, 08:52  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, Google Android
0.4
 

The appearance of a new Android malware family is not that surprising at all today. Especially when we talk about SMS Trojans which are one of the most popular and oldest type of threats created for extracting money from users. A new family of SMS Trojans named Vidro appeared a few days ago but we’ve already collected a lot of APK files with very similar functionality. At the moment all the samples we have found target users only from Poland.

Spreading

Trojan-SMS.AndroidOS.Vidro is spread via porn sites. The mechanism is very similar to the way the very first Android malware (Trojan-SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer) spread. If the user visits a porn site with a desktop browser he will see something similar to this:

But if the potential victim somehow visits the same website using an Android device, a porn web site will be ‘optimized’ for the smartphone:

Incidents|Find and Call: Leak and Spam

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted July 05, 12:26  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, Google, Google Android, Apple
0.6
 

Yesterday we were contacted by our partner MegaFon, one of the major mobile carriers in Russia. They notified us about a suspicious application, which was found in both the Apple App Store and Google Play. At first glance, this seemed to be an SMS worm spread via sending short messages to all contacts stored in the phone book with the URL to itself.

However, our analysis of the iOS and Android versions of the same application showed that it’s not an SMS worm but a Trojan that uploads a user’s phonebook to remote server. The 'replication' part is done by the server - SMS spam messages with the URL to the application are being sent from the remote server to all the contacts in the user’s address book.

The application is called ‘Find and Call’ and can be found in both the iOS Apple App Store and Android’s Google Play. We’ve already informed both Apple and Google but we haven’t received an answer yet.

Find and Call in the Apple Store

Find and Call in the Google Play

All user comments (both in Apple Store and Google Play) are pretty angry and contain the same complaint that the app sends SMS spam:

Angry Birds comments

Virus Watch|Android Security Suite Premium = New ZitMo

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted June 18, 12:30  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, ZeuS, Google Android
0.3
 

On the 4th of June 2012 we found 3 APK files of ~207 kb in size each heuristically detected by our engine as HEUR:Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Zitmo.a. All these applications are malicious and were created to steal incoming SMS messages from infected devices. SMS messages will be uploaded to a remote server whose URL is encrypted and stored inside the body of the Trojan. We found 3 more APK files with exactly the same functionality on 8th, 13th and 14th of June. So there are at least 6 files which pretend to be ‘Android Security Suite Premium’ but in fact were created only for stealing incoming SMS messages.

After the infection there is a blue shield icon in the menu with the name ‘Android Security Suite Premium’:

If the application is launched it will show a generated ‘activation code’:

Virus Watch|Foncy is dead. Long live Mania

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted May 29, 08:32  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, Google Android
0.5
 

The story of the Foncy SMS Trojan started during the fall of 2011. This piece of malware was one of the first SMS Trojans targeting users outside Russia and China. Potential victims were from various countries in Europe, North America and Africa. In the middle of January 2012 Foncy was updated: it started to spread together with an IRC bot and a root exploit. But the end of the Foncy story was very close because in February two suspected authors of this malware were arrested in Paris: you can read the story here in French and here in English. Since then we haven’t found any new modifications of this piece of malware.

So, Foncy is dead. And what is Mania? Mania is an SMS Trojan which currently only targets users of Android from France and its code is very similar to the code of the Foncy malware. The first sample of Mania (Trojan-SMS.AndroidOS.Mania) was found approximately at the same time when the Foncy IRC bot was discovered (during the first half of January). After that new variants of Mania appeared in February, March, April and May.

We haven’t found any traces of Mania on Android Market Google Play. It seems that it is spread via file sharing web sites as popular legitimate applications such as PhoneLocator Pro, BlackList Pro, Enhanced SMS and Caller ID, CoPilot Live Europe, Settings Profiles Full, Advanced Call Blocker and Kaspersky Mobile Security.

Virus Watch|IRC bot for Android

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted January 13, 18:18  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, Google Android
0.5
 

Not so long time ago we found a very interesting piece of malware for Android. Unfortunately, it is not clear how it was spread but in any case it’s worth mentioning. The malicious application displays itself as ‘MADDEN NFL 12’ game after the installation.

The file size is over 5+ MB and actually is a Trojan that drops a set of malware components onto the system: root exploit, SMS Trojan and IRC bot. The .class file "AndroidBotAcitivity" maintains this dropper functionality. It creates a ‘/data/data/com.android.bot/files’ directory and sets ‘777’ permission (read/write/execute for all users). After that it extracts three files - ‘header01.png’ (root exploit), ‘footer01.png’ (IRC bot), ‘border01.png’ (SMS Trojan) - into this directory. Then it sets ‘777’ permission on the root exploit file and executes it. Finally, it displays the text ‘(0x14) Error - Not registred application’ on the screen.

If the exploit is executed successfully and the device is rooted, it launches the IRC bot ‘footer01.png’.

First of all, the IRC bot will try to delete ‘etc/sent’ using the ‘rm’ command:

Virus Watch|Android malware: new traps for users

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted December 29, 10:52  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware
0.3
 

There is no secret that cybercriminals try to intimidate users very often in order to infect their machines. We’ve seen a lot of examples of cybercriminals using black SEO for redirecting users to web pages which emulate AV scanning. And there is no surprise that the results of such ‘scanning’ show that the user’s machine is infected with a lot of dangerous malicious apps and it is very essential to download and install a brand new ‘antivirus program’ which is actually fake AV.

But what about smartphones and mobile phones? Cybercriminals have started to use almost the same techniques in order to force users to download and install malware. But in this case we talk about SMS Trojans with fake AV rudiments. Here are some details.

When looking for some popular mobile apps (e.g. Opera Mini) in Google via a smartphone, several search results will redirect users to a web page which may look like this:

Or this:

Virus Watch|SMS Trojans: all around the world

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted November 25, 09:03  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware
0.3
 

In the middle of July I wrote about porn SMS senders which covertly subscribed users to a range of premium-rate services with the promise of raunchy images. These applications were targeting users from the US, Malaysia, the Netherlands, the UK, Kenya and South Africa. At the end of that blog post I wrote that ‘…the appearance of several applications which use premium rate SMS messages and target users from completely different countries leads us to the conclusion that it’s no longer just a problem in Russia and China, unfortunately’.

Now this problem has evolved to SMS Trojans which target users from a number of European countries and Canada. Yes, these SMS Trojans don’t target either Russian or Chinese smartphone users.

According to the messages we found on Internet forums, the first infections were reported in early September. Somebody downloaded an application to manage and monitor his own SMS/MMS messages, calls and traffic. After launching this application it displayed the message that it was not compatible with the user’s Android version. And then the user’s mobile account was emptied.

We tracked down this application and unsurprisingly it turned up to be an SMS Trojan which sends 4 SMS messages to premium rate numbers. We detect it as Trojan-SMS.AndroidOS.Foncy.

It was spread via a file hosting website with the name ‘SuiConFo.apk’. After installation, it appears on the main menu of Android smartphones:

Virus Watch|Malicious QR Codes Pushing Android Malware

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted September 30, 14:43  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, Google Android, QR code
0.5
 

According to Wikipedia QR code is a type of matrix barcode (or two-dimensional code) first designed for the automotive industry. QR codes are becoming more and more popular today and are used in banners, magazines, transport and badges in order to provide quick and easy access to particular information. A QR code has a pretty big capacity (compared to a simple barcode) and is able to store 7089 numeric characters or 4296 alphanumeric characters; and it is more than enough to store text or URL.

But about the malicious QR codes? Yes, you scan a QR code with the help of your smartphone and it redirects you to a URL with a malicious file (APK or JAR). Such QR codes exist and are gaining in popularity.

Today people who use smartphones often look for new software for their devices with the help of desktop PCs. If a user finds something interesting he or she must retype the application URL in the smartphone browser for downloading it. It’s not very convenient so that’s why such websites have QR codes which can be easily scanned.

It is known that today a lot of mobile malware (especially SMS Trojans) is spread via sinister websites where all software is malicious. And cybercriminals have started to use malicious QR codes for users’ ‘convenience’. Here is an example of such a website:

Part of the website with malicious QR code