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The Internet threat alert status is currently normal. At present, no major epidemics or other serious incidents have been recorded by Kaspersky Lab’s monitoring service. Internet threat level: 1

Net-Worm.Win32.Kido.ih

Detected Feb 20 2009 07:04 GMT
Released Apr 02 2009 16:24 GMT
Published Feb 20 2009 07:04 GMT

Manual description Auto description
This description was created by experts at Kaspersky Lab. It contains the most accurate information available about this program.

Technical Details
Payload
Removal instructions

Technical Details

This network worm spreads via local networks and removable storage media. The program itself is a Windows PE DLL file. The worm components vary in size from 155KB to 165KB. It is packed using UPX.

Installation

The worm copies its executable file with random names as shown below:

%System%\<rnd>
%Program Files%\Internet Explorer\<rnd>.dll 
%Program Files%\Movie Maker\<rnd>.dll 
%All Users Application Data%\<rnd>.dll 
%Temp%\<rnd>.dll 
%Temp%\<rnd>.tmp

<rnd> is a random string of symbols.

In order to ensure that the worm is launched next time the system is started, it creates a system service which launches the worm’s executable file each time Windows is booted. The following registry key will be created:

[HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\netsvcs]

The worm also modifies the following system registry key value:

[HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SvcHost]
"netsvcs" = "<original value> %System%\<rnd>.dll"

Propagation

The worm then launches an HTTP server on a random TCP port; this is then used to download the worm's executable file to other computers.

The worm gets the IP addresses of computers in the same network as the victim machine and attacks them via a buffer overrun vulnerability (MS08-067) in the Server service. The worm sends a specially crafted RPC request to remote machines. This causes a buffer overrun when the wcscpy_s function is called in netapi32.dll; this launches code that downloads the worm's executable file to the victim machine and launches it. The worm is then installed on the new victim machine.

In order to exploit the vulnerability described above, the worm attempts to connect to the Administrator account on the remote machine. The worm uses the passwords shown below to brute force the account:

99999999
9999999
999999
99999
88888888
8888888
888888
88888
8888
888
88
8
77777777
7777777
777777
77777
7777
777
77
7
66666666
6666666
666666
66666
6666
666
66
6
55555555
5555555
555555
55555
5555
555
55
5
44444444
4444444
444444
44444
4444
444
44
4
33333333
3333333
333333
33333
3333
333
33
3
22222222
2222222
222222
22222
2222
222
22
2
11111111
1111111
111111
11111
1111
111
explorer
exchange
customer
cluster
nobody
codeword
codename
changeme
desktop
security
secure
public
system
shadow
office
supervisor
superuser
share
super
secret
server
computer
owner
backup
database
lotus
oracle
business
manager
temporary
ihavenopass
nothing
nopassword
nopass
Internet
internet
example
sample
love123
boss123
work123
home123
mypc123
temp123
test123
qwe123
abc123
pw123
root123
pass123
pass12
pass1
admin123
admin12
admin1
password123
password12
password1
9999
999
99
9
11
1
00000000
0000000
00000
0000
000
00
0987654321
987654321
87654321
7654321
654321
54321
4321
321
21
12
fuck
zzzzz
zzzz
zzz
xxxxx
xxxx
xxx
qqqqq
qqqq
qqq
aaaaa
aaaa
aaa
sql
file
web
foo
job
home
work
intranet
controller
killer
games
private
market
coffee
cookie
forever
freedom
student
account
academia
files
windows
monitor
unknown
anything
letitbe
letmein
domain
access
money
campus
default
foobar
foofoo
temptemp
temp
testtest
test
rootroot
root
adminadmin
mypassword
mypass
pass
Login
login
Password
password
passwd
zxcvbn
zxcvb
zxccxz
zxcxz
qazwsxedc
qazwsx
q1w2e3
qweasdzxc
asdfgh
asdzxc
asddsa
asdsa
qweasd
qwerty
qweewq
qwewq
nimda
administrator
Admin
admin
a1b2c3
1q2w3e
1234qwer
1234abcd
123asd
123qwe
123abc
123321
12321
123123
1234567890
123456789
12345678
1234567
123456
12345
1234
123

Spreading via removable storage media

The worm copies its executable file to all removable media under the following name:

<X>:\RECYCLER\S-<%d%>-<%d%>-%d%>-%d%>-%d%>-%d%>-%d%>\<rnd>.vmx, 

In addition to its executable file, the worm also places the file shown below in the root of every disk:

<X>:\autorun.inf

This file will launch the worm's executable file each time Explorer is used to open the infected disk.


Payload

When launched, the worm injects its code in the address space of one of the active “svchost.exe” system processes. This code delivers the worm's main malicious payload and:

  • disables the following services:
    wuauserv
    BITS
  • blocks access to addresses which contain any of the strings listed below:
    indowsupdate
    wilderssecurity
    threatexpert
    castlecops
    spamhaus
    cpsecure
    arcabit
    emsisoft
    sunbelt
    securecomputing
    rising
    prevx
    pctools
    norman
    k7computing
    ikarus
    hauri
    hacksoft
    gdata
    fortinet
    ewido
    clamav
    comodo
    quickheal
    avira
    avast
    esafe
    ahnlab
    centralcommand
    drweb
    grisoft
    eset
    nod32
    f-prot
    jotti
    kaspersky
    f-secure
    computerassociates
    networkassociates
    etrust
    panda
    sophos
    trendmicro
    mcafee
    norton
    symantec
    microsoft
    defender
    rootkit
    malware
    spyware
    virus

The worm may also download files from links of the type shown below:

http://<URL>/search?q=<%rnd2%> 

rnd2 is a random number; URL is a link generated by a special algorithm which uses the current date. The worm gets the current date from one of the sites shown below:

http://www.w3.org
http://www.ask.com
http://www.msn.com
http://www.yahoo.com
http://www.google.com
http://www.baidu.com

Downloaded files are saved to the Windows system directory under their original names.


Removal instructions

If your computer does not have an up-to-date antivirus solution, or does not have an antivirus solution at all, you can either use a special removal tool (which can be found here or follow the instructions below:

  1. Delete the following system registry key:
    [HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\netsvcs] 
  2. Delete “%System%\<rnd>.dll” from the system registry key value shown below:
    [HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SvcHost]
    "netsvcs"
  3. Reboot the computer.
  4. Delete the original worm file (the location will depend on how the program originally penetrated the victim machine).
  5. Delete copies of the worm:
    %System%\<rnd>
    %Program Files%\Internet Explorer\<rnd>.dll 
    %Program Files%\Movie Maker\<rnd>.dll 
    %All Users Application Data%\<rnd>.dll 
    %Temp%\<rnd>.dll 
    %Temp%\<rnd>.tmp
    

    <rnd> is a random string of symbols.

  6. Delete the files shown below from all removable storage media:
    <X>:\autorun.inf
    <X>:\RECYCLER\S-<%d%>-<%d%>-%d%>-%d%>-%d%>-%d%>-%d%>\<rnd>.vmx, 
  7. Download and install updates for the operating system:
     http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/Bulletin/MS08-067.mspx
    Update your antivirus databases and perform a full scan of the computer (download a trial version of Kaspersky Anti-Virus).

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Net-Worm

Net-Worms propagate via computer networks. The distinguishing feature of this type of worm is that it does not require user action in order to spread.

This type of worm usually searches for critical vulnerabilities in software running on networked computers. In order to infect the computers on the network, the worm sends a specially crafted network packet (called an exploit) and as a result the worm code (or part of the worm code) penetrates the victim computer and activates. Sometimes the network packet only contains the part of the worm code which will download and run a file containing the main worm module. Some network worms use several exploits simultaneously to spread, thus increasing the speed at which they find victims.


Other versions

Aliases

Net-Worm.Win32.Kido.ih (Kaspersky Lab) is also known as:

  • Worm.Win32.AutoRun.zfe (Kaspersky Lab)
  • Virus: W32/Conficker.worm (McAfee)
  • Trojan.Agent-71049 (ClamAV)
  • Worm.Kido-225 (ClamAV)
  • W32/Conficker.C.worm (Panda)
  • Worm:Win32/Conficker.C (MS(OneCare))
  • Win32.HLLW.Autoruner.5555 (DrWeb)
  • Win32/Conficker.AA worm (Nod32)
  • Win32/Conficker.AS worm (Nod32)
  • Win32.Worm.Downadup.Gen (BitDef7)
  • Worm.Kido.ZW (VirusBuster)
  • Worm.Kido.MP (VirusBuster)
  • Win32:Dropper-KMH [Drp] (AVAST)
  • Net-Worm.Win32.Kido (Ikarus)
  • I-Worm/Generic.DNY (AVG)
  • Worm/Downadup (AVG)
  • WORM/Conficker.Y.11 (AVIRA)
  • WORM/Conficker.M (AVIRA)
  • WORM/Conficker.R (AVIRA)
  • Conficker.HQ (Norman)
  • Hack.Exploit.Win32.MS08-067.z (Rising)
  • Trojan.Win32.Fednu.tzt (Rising)
  • Win32.Worm.Downadup.Gen [Aquarius] (FSecure)
  • WORM_DOWNAD.AD (TrendMicro)
  • Worm.Win32.Downad.Gen (v) (Sunbelt)
  • Worm.Kido.ZW (VirusBusterBeta)
  • Worm.Kido.MP (VirusBusterBeta)
  • W32/Conficker.C!worm (Fortinet)
  • Win32.Worm.Downadup.Gen (GData)