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The Internet threat alert status is currently normal. At present, no major epidemics or other serious incidents have been recorded by Kaspersky Lab’s monitoring service. Internet threat level: 1
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0.4
 

Google Chrome users are being targeted these days by a wave of attacks that uses malicious extensions hosted in the official Chrome Web Store. The attack appears to be of Turkish origin and is using Facebook to spread. We saw users of different nationalities infected with the malicious extensions, which the cybercriminals are sending to the official store regularly, in a cat-and-mouse game.

As we already reported in March 2012, Brazilian cybercriminals were able at that time to host a malicious extension in the Chrome Web Store. Since then in June 2012 Google has changed the way users can add third party browser extensions i.e. not allowing the installation that are not hosted on the official Web Store. More recently Google removed the possibility of silent installations, which has been widely abused by third parties.

Maybe for these reasons bad guys started to concentrate their efforts to upload bad extensions to the official store. Now itís the turn of Turkish cybercriminals; they were able to host several extensions there in the last few days.

0.3
 

Today, cybercriminals are quick to exploit vulnerabilities in Adobe Reader, Flash and Java to infect users’ computers. There is a simple reason for this popularity: exploits of vulnerabilities found in these products can infect computers regardless of which operating systems and browsers are used on the attacked machines. We assumed that the threats posed to users were unaffected by their choice of browser and undertook a little research to test this assumption.


Picture courtesy of the PCMAG website

0.4
 

Since November 2011, according to recent statistics, Google Chrome has become the most popular browser in Brazil (more than 45% of the market share).

The same has is true for Facebook, which now is the most popular social network in Brazil, with a total of 42 million users, displacing Orkut.

These two facts are enough to motivate Brazil’s bad guys to turn their attentions to both platforms. This month we saw a huge wave of attacks targeting Brazilian users of Facebook, based on the distribution of malicious extensions. There are several themes used in these attacks, including “Change the color of your profile” and “Discover who visited your profile” and some bordering on social engineering such as “Learn how to remove the virus from your Facebook profile”:

1) Click on Install app, 2) Click on Allow or Continue, 3) Click on Install now, After doing these steps, close the browser and open again

This last one caught our attention not because it asks the user to install a malicious extension, but because the malicious extension it’s hosted at the official Google's Chrome Web Store. If the user clicks on “Install aplicativo” he will be redirected to the official store. The malicious extension presents itself as “Adobe Flash Player”:

0.1
 

The Adobe AIR and Adobe Flash Player Incubator program updated their Flash Platform runtime beta program to version 5, delivered as Flash Player version 11.2.300.130. It includes a "sandboxed" version of the 32-bit Flash Player they are calling "Protected Mode for Mozilla Firefox on Windows 7 and Windows Vista systems". It has been over a year since Adobe discussed the Internet Explorer ActiveX Protected Mode version release on their ASSET blog, and the version running on Google Chrome was sandboxed too.

Adobe is building on the successes that they have seen in their Adobe Reader X software. Its sandbox technology has substantially raised the bar for driving up the costs of "offensive research", resulting in a dearth of Itw exploits on Reader X. As in "none" in 2011. This trend reflects 2011 targeted attack activity that we’ve observed. 2011 APT related attacks nailed outdated versions of Adobe Flash software delivered as "authplay.dll" in Adobe Reader v8.x and v9.x and the general Flash component "NPSWF32.dll" used by older versions of Microsoft Office and other applications. Adobe X just wasn't hit. IE Protected Mode wasn't hit. Chrome sandboxed Flash wasn't hit. If there are incident handlers out there that saw a different story, please let me know.

0.3
 

The Democratic Party of Hong Kong's website was compromised and malware uploaded to the web server. Interestingly, the server was distributing malicious flash and spyware nearly identical to the compromised UK Amnesty International servers at the beginning of this month. The server is being cleaned up.

The english version of the website did not include injected iframe links pointing to the exploit.html page, which in turn delivers three different version-appropriate malicious variants of flash detected by Kaspersky as "Exploit.SWF.CVE-2011-0611". The malicious flash was 0day at the beginning of this month, and will be effective on unpatched systems.

Incidents|Beware of free plug-ins

Dmitry Bestuzhev
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted June 17, 21:45  GMT
Tags: Browser Plugins
0
 

Do you like e-books? Free ones? They’re easy to find: e-books are often uploaded to public servers such as rapdishare, megaupload and others. Anyone who finds the link can download books from such websites for free.

Is is safe? Well – judge for yourself. Just the other day I found a browser plug-in on BitRoad dot net that people can download and use as a tool to download e-books. The plug-in is browser independent and attacks both IE and Firefox.

And yes…it was malware - AdWare.Win32.Kitsune.f. I checked for detection on Virus Total and the results were not great – 9/32 (26.13%).

And this is just one incident. In reality, this occurs every day. Plug-ins on any open freeware website can be malicious - there are no guarantees and obligations, after all. So...stay safe and surf cautiously. As ever.

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