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Events|Hashcat's GPU-accelerated Gauss encryption cracker

GReAT
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted December 28, 10:45  GMT
Tags: Linux, AMD, Gauss
0.6
 

2012 was a year full of major security incidents: Flame, Shamoon, Flashback, Wiper, Gauss, and so on. As we are about to turn the page, many unsolved mysteries remain still. Perhaps the most interesting unsolved mysteries are related to the Gauss Trojan: the Palida Narrow font and the unknown encrypted payload.

Previously, we’ve published a blogpost about the encrypted payload hoping that the crypto community will take on the challenge and break the encryption scheme to reveal the true purpose of the mysterious malware.

Virus Watch|Malware in the Amazon App Store

Roel
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted December 19, 15:50  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, Google Android
0.2
 

Like many others, I took advantage of Amazon.com's sale and ordered a Kindle Fire HD last week. When I got around to exploring the Amazon App Store, it didn't take long before running into malware.

While searching for a particular benchmarking app I was presented with some additional apps. One of them immediately looked suspicious.

Virus Watch|GrooveMonitor: Another Wiper Copycat?

Roel
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted December 17, 15:37  GMT
Tags: Targeted Attacks, Wiper
0.2
 

Yesterday the Iranian CERT made an announcement about a new piece of wiper-like malware. We detect these files as Trojan.Win32.Maya.a.

This is an extremely simplistic attack. In essence, the attacker wrote some BAT files and then used a BAT2EXE tool to turn them into Windows PE files. The author seems to have used (a variant of) this particular BAT2EXE tool.

There's no connection to any of the previous wiper-like attacks we've seen. We also don't have any reports of this malware from the wild.

Virus Watch|Carberp-in-the-Mobile

Denis
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted December 14, 11:39  GMT
Tags: Mobile Malware, Internet Banking, Google, ZeuS, Google Android, QR code
0.4
 

We previously wrote several times about Man-in-the-Mobile attacks which aim to steal mTANs sent via SMS. For a long time, only two families of such malware have been known: ZeuS-in-the-Mobile (ZitMo) and SpyEye-in-the-Mobile (SpitMo). ZitMo and SpitMo work together with their Windows ‘brothers’. Actually, without them, they would look like trivial SMS spy Trojans. It is necessary to mention that during the last two years such attacks have been observed only in some European countries like Spain, Italy, Germany, Poland and few others.

But when the mobile version of Carberp Trojan appeared (we detect it as Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Citmo, Carberp-in-the-Mobile) such attacks became real in Russia as well. There is no secret that online banking is becoming more and more popular in Russia; and banks are very active in promoting online banking with various authorization methods.

Carberp for Windows works in a similar way to the ZeuS Trojan. If a user tries to login into his online banking account using a machine infected by Carberp, the malware will modify the transaction so that user credentials are sent to a malicious server rather than a bank server.

In addition to the login and password, cybercriminals still need mTANs in order to confirm any money transfer operation from a stolen account. That is why one of the Carberp modifications (we call it Trojan-Spy.Win32.Carberp.ugu and we've added detection for it on 11th of December) alters the online banking web page on the fly, inviting the user to download and install an application which is allegedly necessary for logging into the system. And the user can get this link via SMS message by entering his phone number or by scanning a QR-code:

According to this screenshot, users of one of the most popular Russian banks, Sberbank, are under attack. ‘Sberbank’ updated its web page on 12th of December with information about the attack. The link in the QR-code led to the fake ‘SberSafe’ application (Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Citmo) which has been in Google Play since 30th of November.

0.1
 

The folks at the Microsoft Security Response Center are winding down 2012 with another full release of seven Security Bulletins containing fixes for memory corruption on application, server, and system code along with a Certificate Bypass problem and set of fixes for Oracle Outside In software components. Within the seven Bulletins, they are patching at least 11 vulnerabilities, accurately described in the Advanced notification for this month. The MSRC recommends that their Internet Explorer (MS12-077) and Microsoft Word (MS12-079) updates are addressed asap.

The December 2012 Microsoft Security Bulletin Release fixes a varying array of versions of software and platforms per Bulletin. For consumers, that mostly means ensuring that the Microsoft Update software is enabled, run, and selected patches applied. For the vast majority of Windows customers, this month's release also requires that customers reboot their systems following the updates - the Internet Explorer, the kernel level font parsing updates and the file handling updates all require a reboot and hotpatching is not supported. The lack of hotpatch support means that the fix is not enabled on the system until it is rebooted. For IT folks in large and small organizations, this month's Release also requires some time set aside to understand whether or not your organization is running the versions of software requiring patches and accordingly address your environment.

The Microsoft Internet Explorer code maintains three different use-after-free vulnerabilities that are being patched this month. This "use-after-free" category of bugs is continuing to prove very difficult to stamp out, even in meaty, prevalent attack vectors like Internet Explorer. It was this sort of vulnerability that was abused in the 2010 Aurora cyber-espionage attacks on Google, Adobe, and the long list of other international corporate names that continue to maintain their incidents undisclosed and in the dark. At least one of these Internet Explorer vulnerabilities is likely to have exploit code developed against it.

As a vector of delivery for spearphish attacks, Microsoft Office seems to me to be the most popular target in the second half of the year. CVE-2012-0158 and CVE-2010-3333 continue to be identified in malicious attachments (both malicious Word and Excel files) in targeted attacks across the globe, while Adobe Reader and Flash, which were heavily abused, almost have fallen off the map. I don't know if this coincides with the release and distribution of the newly armored Adobe Reader X software and more sandboxing for Flash, or simply that offensive security investment in late summer had been directed toward producing toolkits that pump out the Office exploits we are seeing now. Either way, be sure to patch this Word flaw CVE-2012-2539 asap.

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Unfortunately, we have seen kernel level exploits bundled into mass-exploitation kits like Blackhole. The Duqu exploit, previously used in very targeted attacks throughout the middle east, is being re-used in this manner. And MS12-078 this month patches kernel mode RCE for OpenType and TrueType font parsing flaws. The recent mass-exploitation activity increases and interest in kernel level font parsing vulnerabilities coincides with the open source github release of Microsoft font fuzzing tools and projects.

More of the Oracle Outside In code is being updated this month with a pile of publicly known critical vulnerabilities being patched much like in August of this year. Critical and Important Microsoft Exchange, DirectPlay, and IPHTTPS components are also being patched this month.

Also following up the annnouncement of the Microsoft software update release, Microsoft announced the availability of security updates for Adobe Flash that effect Internet Explorer users, among others. The flaws include a RCE buffer overflow vulnerability (CVE-2012-5676), RCE integer overflow vulnerability (CVE-2012-5677), and memory corruption vulnerability (CVE-2012-5678). For my production workstations and mobile devices, I've got multiple web browsers, and each one uses a different implementation of Flash. In my case, on my production systems, I visit this page with each browser to determine whether or not I have the lastest version of Flash. Android systems are effected too, and you can find more information at Adobe's APSB12-27. Perhaps we will see a resurgence of Flash exploitation over the next few weeks and into the New Year.

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Research|WiFi study in Dubai

Dmitry Bestuzhev
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted December 10, 11:34  GMT
Tags: Wardriving, Wi-Fi
0.1
 

Why in Dubai? First, I was there recently.  Second,  Dubai has become one of the most important cities in the world for holding IT conferences.

All statistics are based on around 3 thousand found WiFi access points.  Let’s begin with the channels Dubai’s WiFi is running on:

Events|Hot Topic in Icy Country

Marco
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted December 04, 08:03  GMT
Tags: Conferences, Trainings, Passwords
0.2
 

These days Passwords^12 is taking place in Oslo - a conference only dedicated to passwords and pin codes. With temperatures around -15 degrees (Celsius) outside, in the conference rooms of the University in Oslo, Department of Informatics, talks by well known security experts are given.

Every day you use passwords. While logging on to your computer, smartphone or tablet, accessing your emails or your social network site and also for online banking and online shopping. Recent database breaches of user logins show that there is a high demand for more security in this area. During these days talks and discussions only care about this.