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Incidents|The Brazilian Phishing World Cup

Fabio Assolini
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted March 11, 11:19  GMT
Tags: Spam Letters, Credit Cards
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The 2014 FIFA World Cup has already kicked off, at least for Brazilian bad guys. Next year’s big event in Brazil has become one of the most prominent tactics used by Latin American cybercriminals as they unleash a real avalanche of phishing messages, fraudulent prizes and giveaways, malicious domains, fake tickets, credit card cloning, banking Trojans and a lot of social engineering.

Indeed Brazil figured among the top five countries where users risk being caught ‘offside’ by phishing attacks, according to a recent study conducted by RSA and released in January. The country is in fourth place, along with the UK, USA, Canada and South Africa. So it's no big surprise to find four Brazilian brands in the Top 10 most targeted on PhishTank stats.

Offers range from alleged cash prizes, trips and tickets to watch the games, while the attacks involve massive phishing mailings, and, to add spurious credibility, stars of the national soccer team have been ‘signed up’ by the conmen. Here’s one example featuring Neymar, the latest Brazilian hero to be dubbed the new Pelé:

"Win a new car, cash prizes and tickets for the World Cup, just click and subscribe now"

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We wrote in our predictions for 2011 about cyber attacks that steal everything. In fact cybercriminals are interested in stealing all kinds of data, including the miles you accumulate in frequent flyer programs. Customers of Brazilian airline companies are being targeted by a flood of phishing messages whose goal is to steal customer’s accounts and their miles in the frequent flyer programs maintained by local airlines. The miles stolen from customers are becoming a new kind of currency among Brazilian cybercriminals and phishers, who can use them to issue tickets for themselves, sell tickets to other criminals or use them in barter schemes.

The attacks involve the sending of phishing messages in mass mailings that promise more points in a frequent flyer program or offer a supposed prize. In some attacks the customer is asked to re-register on a fake website:

"Register now and earn more miles in the frequent flyer program"

Incidents|Data Leaks and Phishing: an explosive combination

Fabio Assolini
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted November 03, 18:02  GMT
Tags: Identity Theft, Data leaks
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Brazilian internet users are being attacked this week with an interesting phishing scheme: the message is showing real personal data of the victim, in a clear attempt to trick users into installing a trojan banker on his machine.

The message is sent to the victim using the name of a big Brazilian bank and in the body it shows the complete name of the user and his CPF – the Natural Persons Register, the equivalent of a Social Security Number used by Brazilian government to identify each citizen:

The CPF is one of the most important documents for anyone living in Brazil. The number is unique and is a prerequisite for a series of tasks like opening bank accounts, to get or renew a driver’s license, buying or selling real estate, receiving loans, applying for jobs (especially public ones), getting a passport or credit cards. Using such data it is possible to for a cybercriminal to impersonate the victim and steal his identity in order to access resources or obtain credit and other benefits in that person's name.

This is a case when a data leak incident meets phishers. This kind of accurate information can only be obtained in data leak incidents. Not surprisingly it’s common that the Brazilian media notices criminals selling CDs with the full data of Brazilian IRS system where you can find a lot of sensitive data, including the CPF numbers. In a simple search you can find people in Brazil selling CDs of possible IRS and CPF numbers costing only $ 190.00.

This is not the first time Brazilians have been a target of phishing using real data: last year customers of an important airline company were victims of a phishing attack using their real names and the number of their rewards program.

Kaspersky detects the malware involved in this attack as Trojan-Downloader.Win32.Delf.agkm.

When receiving e-mails, even e-mails showing your personal data, you can't be too careful.

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