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One of the main rules of IT security is to be very cautious when dealing with archived attachments in emails. “If you’re not sure, don’t open it!” It’s an easy rule to follow when the text in the message obviously has nothing to do with you.

When an experienced user reads about IT security problems at a bank where they don’t have an account, or about winning a lottery that they never bought a ticket for, then it’s usually immediately obvious that they are faced with yet another example of spam and there’s absolutely no reason to open the attached ZIP file. Cybercriminals will often resort to all types of social engineering to trick people into passing on their personal data and/or infecting their own computers. More often than not, they send messages that are made to look as though they come from well-known companies that either offer rewards for those that fill out or run the attached files (even stooping to threats of all kinds for those that fail to do so). But less mundane approaches are also used.

Spam Test|SQL for dummies

Natalia Zablotskaya
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted September 07, 10:53  GMT
Tags: Spammer techniques, Spam Statistics
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In their attempts to bypass e-mail filtering systems and deliver their information to users, spammers often resort to all sorts of tricks. Although really new tricks (such as distributing mp3 files with voice-generated messages) are relatively uncommon, sometimes they do come up.

Kaspersky Lab analysts have recently come across a few curious samples. While masking text with noise is nothing out of the ordinary, the links were arranged in a rather unusual way.

The trick itself turned out to be rather simple and has been relatively harmless so far: a URL in the message is a request to a website that is vulnerable to SQL injection. The code yields one string, which is a spam link (in this case, a typical pharmacy ad). This is where the browser is redirected – naturally, if the original site allows such code to be executed.

Some instances we encountered during a week of observations demonstrate that following a large-scale SQL-attack LizaMoon many website owners took relevant security measures and finding suitable “donors” on a mass scale was not at all that simple.

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Events|Pentagon for sale

Natalia Zablotskaya
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted February 17, 12:12  GMT
Tags: Spam Letters, Email
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Here’s an unusual spam message that turned up today:

If it wasn’t for the official name at the top of the message, you could almost be forgiven for thinking it was just another real estate advert… “Fully furnished. Situated close to retail outlets. Excellent access to public transport and local schools. Contact US Department of Defense for more details…”

But on a more serious note, the aim of this mailing was most probably to check an address database. So, whatever you do, don’t reply to stuff like this. In any case, spammers often fake their return address so that all your emotional outpourings are unlikely to reach the right people. And if the spammers do use their real address, any response from you will confirm your account is active and you’ll end up getting much more unwanted mail.

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It’s a classic type of network fraud: you receive a letter asking you to send the login and password for your e-mail/online wallet/gaming account/etc. If you fail to comply, the phoney “support service” that sent the message threatens to limit or even block your access to the service.

Today our spam traps detected a letter like this in which the fraudsters were trying to swindle users out of out their activation codes for…Kaspersky Lab products! However, that’s not all – they also wanted to know the recipient’s residential address, mobile phone number and credit card number. They only stopped short of asking for the house keys.

“Dear User! Thank you for choosing our products. Unfortunately, recently more and more hackers have tried to use our name to steal information! Kaspersky Lab always cares about your security therefore we believe it is necessary to inform you about new malware! Please be informed that we have carried out preventive measures aimed at combating hackers! To confirm that you are using our licensed product please send us your full activation code information. Please also send your residence address, mobile phone number, credit card number (in order to pay for a license extension). Otherwise, our company will have to impose severe sanctions, including blocking access to your operating system. Best regards, Kaspersky Lab.”

Hopefully, our users are not naïve enough to fall for such a primitive scam. There’s no need to explain that Kaspersky Lab would never send out letters like this, especially such threatening messages. It’s nothing more than a crude attempt to obtain some confidential data from some unsuspecting user.

To be fair, the letter does contain a number of true statements. For instance, it states that hackers make use of our name, which they do. And the authors state that Kaspersky Lab cares about the security of its users. That’s also true.

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Spam Test|The return of mp3 spam

Natalia Zablotskaya
Kaspersky Lab Expert
Posted December 17, 13:54  GMT
Tags: Spammer techniques
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We've just detected a wave of mp3 spam. There aren't any links in the message: all the information is in the audio file attached to the message.

Play the file, and you get 4 seconds of a female voice giving a web address for Viagra and similar medications. In the background there are passionate sighs and groans (presumably to persuade you that by purchasing Viagra, you'll reach unparalleled heights of bliss!)

Just in case you can't make out what the woman's saying, the key words 'CHEAP VIAGRA' and the site address are included in the name of the track.

Spam in mp3 format first appeared in autumn 2007, pushing pump and dump shares. Audio spam never took off because of a whole range of limitations such as the large file size, and the poor quality of the recordings. Today's mailing, though, shows that spammers are having another go at using this technique to push their goods and services.

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